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    About NAWL

    The mission of the National Association of Women Lawyers is to provide leadership, a collective voice, and essential resources to advance women in the legal profession and advocate for the equality of women under the law. Since 1899, NAWL has been empowering women in the legal profession, cultivating a diverse membership dedicated to equality, mutual support, and collective success.

    NAWL Amends Statement of Qualification of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    Read the Statement>>

    National Association of Women Lawyers Joins with American Bar Association’s Call for Due Process and Full Investigation Of Allegations Raised Against U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    The National Association of Women Lawyers joins in the American Bar Association’s call for due process and a full investigation into the allegations raised against Judge Kavanaugh before the Senate votes on his nomination. The lawyer members of the ABA and NAWL are colleagues and peers of Judge Kavanaugh and, as such, are uniquely qualified to weigh in on both his nomination and the integrity of the nomination process. Judge Kavanaugh’s appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday raised new questions on his veracity and whether he has the temperament to serve on our highest court. More importantly, the Committee’s decision to ignore precedent and not refer the allegations made against Judge Kavanaugh to the FBI for a full and objective investigation is a dereliction of its duty and is unfair to the nominee and those who have testified and submitted evidence before the Committee.  

    The credibility and legitimacy of this nomination and, by extension, our highest court is at stake.  Only due process can guarantee a fair outcome for the nominee and the citizens of this country.  We agree with the ABA that “[e]ach appointment to our nation's highest court (as with all others) is simply too important to rush to a vote.”

    NAWL Urges Senate Judiciary Committee to Ensure Due Process in Vetting of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    The National Association of Women Lawyers applauds the Senate Judiciary Committee's commitment to due process by continuing its hearings on the nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.  We, however, disagree with the Committee’s decision to ignore precedent and proceed with testimony related to events that have not been appropriately and objectively investigated by the FBI, which would benefit all involved and lend credibility to the Committee’s process and result.

    The Supreme Court is the highest court of our land and, since this nation's founding, its justices have served as the guardians of those rights guaranteed under our Constitution.  As citizens and women lawyers, we expect nothing less from each justice than that they bring to the bench an intellectual rigor, an unwavering commitment to the rule of law, and the highest ethical and moral character.  We trust that those who are charged with the responsibility of ensuring that Judge Kavanaugh meets those high ideals will give due consideration to and treat with equal respect all who appear, whether it is the nominee or other witnesses called to provide evidence and testify before the Senate.  The American people deserve nothing less from our elected representatives and from those who would seek to hold a lifetime appointment on our highest court.

    NAWL Submits Statement of Qualification of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh to Senate Judiciary Committee

    Read the Statement>>
    Learn more about the mission and procedures of the NAWL Committee for the Evaluation of Supreme Court Nominees>>

    NAWL Announces Its 2018-2019 Board of Directors

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    President's Message

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    Sarretta C. McDonough
    NAWL President
    2018-2019

    A Message From NAWL's 2018-2019 President

    I am honored to serve as NAWL’s President for the coming year.

    In 1899, the hurdles facing equality for women, much less equality for women lawyers in their chosen profession, must have looked insurmountable. Women could not vote; most women did not have access to education; those who had access had very confined and limited options for work—for most, the only real career option was marriage and motherhood. Beyond these practical limitations, society resisted change to traditional gender roles. Amazing then, that even in the face of these realities, a group of women lawyers refused to accept the status quo and had the vision and determination to effect change.

    Read More>>

    NAWL News

    New survey finds even bigger gender gap in big law partner payDan Packel writes, "Awareness of the gender pay gap among law firm partners may be rising, thanks in part to a number of high-profile lawsuits. But the pay gap itself?It may be getting worse.That’s the lesson from a new partner compensation survey out Thursday from Major, Lindsey & Africa. The l
    Americans value equality at work more than equality at homeClaire Cain Miller writes, "Americans have grown increasingly likely to believe that women and men should have equal roles at work, in politics and at home. But a significant share still say that men’s and women’s roles should be different at home — even when they believe they should be equal at wor
    Wall Street rule for the #MeToo era: Avoid women at all costGillian Tan and Katia Porzecanski write, "No more dinners with female colleagues. Don’t sit next to them on flights. Book hotel rooms on different floors. Avoid one-on-one meetings. In fact, as a wealth adviser put it, just hiring a woman these days is “an unknown risk.” What if she took someth
    Federal Judiciary gets its first 'judicial integrity officer'Tom McParland writes, "Jill Langley, the former director of workplace relations for the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit, has been named the federal judiciary’s first judicial integrity officer, the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts announced Monday.A longtime authority in employ
    A Study of West Point shows how women help each other advanceNick Huntington-Klein and Elaina Rose write,"Over the last several decades, women have made tremendous gains in many professions. Women physicians, for instance, were a rarity in the 1960s. Today, about 35% of physicians are women, and the representation will only increase as women—who constitute ov
    Why female litigators leave big law—and what could get them to stayRobert Storace writes, "The big picture in Big Law was drastically different 30 years ago when women were paid much less than men, had very few positions of power and—in some cases—would walk into a room and be mistaken for the court reporter.Those days are fading, female lawyers say, but inequiti

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    A NAWL membership offers you the opportunity to join a diverse group of professionals and enjoy a variety of benefits, including:

    - Access to career development and CLE programing
    - Opportunities to build a national network
    - Leadership Development
    - Advocacy
    - Community Outreach
    - Continued Learning

    NAWL welcomes the individual attorneys, including private practice, corporate, academic, government and non-profit attorneys, and groups, including law firms, corporate legal departments, law schools, and bar associations.

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    National Association of Women Lawyers®

    American Bar Center MS 17.1, 321 North Clark Street, Chicago, IL 60654
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