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    About NAWL

    The mission of the National Association of Women Lawyers is to provide leadership, a collective voice, and essential resources to advance women in the legal profession and advocate for the equality of women under the law. Since 1899, NAWL has been empowering women in the legal profession, cultivating a diverse membership dedicated to equality, mutual support, and collective success.

    NAWL Amends Statement of Qualification of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    Read the Statement>>

    National Association of Women Lawyers Joins with American Bar Association’s Call for Due Process and Full Investigation Of Allegations Raised Against U.S. Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    The National Association of Women Lawyers joins in the American Bar Association’s call for due process and a full investigation into the allegations raised against Judge Kavanaugh before the Senate votes on his nomination. The lawyer members of the ABA and NAWL are colleagues and peers of Judge Kavanaugh and, as such, are uniquely qualified to weigh in on both his nomination and the integrity of the nomination process. Judge Kavanaugh’s appearance before the Senate Judiciary Committee yesterday raised new questions on his veracity and whether he has the temperament to serve on our highest court. More importantly, the Committee’s decision to ignore precedent and not refer the allegations made against Judge Kavanaugh to the FBI for a full and objective investigation is a dereliction of its duty and is unfair to the nominee and those who have testified and submitted evidence before the Committee.  

    The credibility and legitimacy of this nomination and, by extension, our highest court is at stake.  Only due process can guarantee a fair outcome for the nominee and the citizens of this country.  We agree with the ABA that “[e]ach appointment to our nation's highest court (as with all others) is simply too important to rush to a vote.”

    NAWL Urges Senate Judiciary Committee to Ensure Due Process in Vetting of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh

    The National Association of Women Lawyers applauds the Senate Judiciary Committee's commitment to due process by continuing its hearings on the nomination of Judge Kavanaugh to the Supreme Court.  We, however, disagree with the Committee’s decision to ignore precedent and proceed with testimony related to events that have not been appropriately and objectively investigated by the FBI, which would benefit all involved and lend credibility to the Committee’s process and result.

    The Supreme Court is the highest court of our land and, since this nation's founding, its justices have served as the guardians of those rights guaranteed under our Constitution.  As citizens and women lawyers, we expect nothing less from each justice than that they bring to the bench an intellectual rigor, an unwavering commitment to the rule of law, and the highest ethical and moral character.  We trust that those who are charged with the responsibility of ensuring that Judge Kavanaugh meets those high ideals will give due consideration to and treat with equal respect all who appear, whether it is the nominee or other witnesses called to provide evidence and testify before the Senate.  The American people deserve nothing less from our elected representatives and from those who would seek to hold a lifetime appointment on our highest court.

    NAWL Submits Statement of Qualification of Supreme Court Nominee Hon. Brett Kavanaugh to Senate Judiciary Committee

    Read the Statement>>
    Learn more about the mission and procedures of the NAWL Committee for the Evaluation of Supreme Court Nominees>>

    NAWL Announces Its 2018-2019 Board of Directors

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    President's Message

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    Sarretta C. McDonough
    NAWL President
    2018-2019

    A Message From NAWL's 2018-2019 President

    I am honored to serve as NAWL’s President for the coming year.

    In 1899, the hurdles facing equality for women, much less equality for women lawyers in their chosen profession, must have looked insurmountable. Women could not vote; most women did not have access to education; those who had access had very confined and limited options for work—for most, the only real career option was marriage and motherhood. Beyond these practical limitations, society resisted change to traditional gender roles. Amazing then, that even in the face of these realities, a group of women lawyers refused to accept the status quo and had the vision and determination to effect change.

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    NAWL News

    Facebook to drop forced arbitration in harassment casesDaisuke Wakabayashi and Jessica Silver-Greenberg write, “SAN FRANCISCO — Facebook said on Friday that it would no longer force employees to settle sexual harassment claims in private arbitration, making it the latest technology company to do away with a practice that critics say has stacked the deck
    Trump administration issues rules permitting birth control coverage exemptionNatasha Bach writes, “The Trump administration issued two rules on Wednesday that will permit some employers to opt out of providing coverage for birth control based on religious or moral grounds.The first rule provides an exemption to companies that object to birth control coverage due to “religi
    Google ends forced arbitration after employee walkoutFrom Fortune: “Google changed some policies on sexual misconduct after thousands of employees walked out of their offices last week to protest big payouts for executives accused of harassment and other misbehavior.The Alphabet Inc. unit is making arbitration optional for individual sexual harassme
    How many women lawyers were elected in the midterms? Quite a fewMarcia Coyle writes, “Among an estimated 118 women elected and re-elected to Congress in Tuesday’s midterm elections, roughly one-third will be putting their law degrees to work in their new legislative duties.The 37 lawyer-legislators are diverse in race, ethnicity, law schools and legal experien
    Ginsburg out of hospital, will work from homeTony Mauro writes, “U.S. Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg was released from the hospital Friday morning, a day after she was admitted for treatment of three broken ribs, the court announced.Ginsburg is “doing well and plans to work from home today,” court spokeswoman Kathy Arberg said in
    Tokyo medical school offers places to women after sexism scandalJustin McCurry writes, “A Japanese medical school at the centre of a sexism row has offered places to dozens of women who were unfairly rejected in favour of male candidates.Tokyo Medical University said this week that it would accept women whose exam scores were deliberately marked down to restri

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    Join NAWL

    A NAWL membership offers you the opportunity to join a diverse group of professionals and enjoy a variety of benefits, including:

    - Access to career development and CLE programing
    - Opportunities to build a national network
    - Leadership Development
    - Advocacy
    - Community Outreach
    - Continued Learning

    NAWL welcomes the individual attorneys, including private practice, corporate, academic, government and non-profit attorneys, and groups, including law firms, corporate legal departments, law schools, and bar associations.

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    National Association of Women Lawyers®

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